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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 10:45 am 
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My answer will assume you mean resigning from your job. My answer will assume you are employed in an ordinary role the same as most people, and you are not middle or upper management or C-level. My answer will also assume you are employed at will, as are most people. I will also assume you have not told anyone you plan to resign.

Under at-will employment, employers can terminate employment at any time, for no reason and without notice. So can employees: they can terminate employment at any time, for no reason and without notice. Therefore, under at-will employment, you can submit your resignation to your employer and leave. There is nothing illegal about it. Your employer has to pay you through your last day. You would have to return any equipment your employer issued to you to do your job and you would have to return your building keys.

Most of the time, resigning without notice and leaving is not a good idea. If a person must resign, it’s better to give as much notice as possible and, generally, not less than two weeks. Giving notice is really the right thing to do.

On the other hand, under normal circumstances not including layoffs, when was the last time you heard of an employer giving an employee a termination notice? You haven’t. But employees still feel they must give notice so employer gives them positive references. The hypocrisy is apparent.

Nonetheless, good references are an important consideration that offsets the hypocrisy. Giving notice will not guarantee positive references. Even if one gives notice and had a good record, employer policy (and not necessarily state law) may permit bosses and HR only to confirm dates of employment, eligibility for rehire and maybe pay.

There are situations where employees are justified in leaving without notice. Such situations include but are not limited to employers having treated employees unfairly by any reasonable standard or abusively. One example might be employer dumping excessive work on employee to motivate him/her to leave. Employers do get to dump work on employees. When work is dumped on them to motivate their departure, the line is crossed and it becomes harassment - employee would thus be justified in walking out.

A more egregious example would be toxic work environment: e.g., employer repeatedly sexually harasses employee or systematically harasses employee another way, and employee had no choice but to leave without notice. In such situations, the law might see it as “constructive discharge,” which is a form of wrongful discharge. Employee could hold employer accountable for its actions in court, but, warning: it’s not easy, even if one has a case. Extreme examples.

Most of the time, if one resigns and leaves without notice, employer is likely to give a negative reference or a neutral reference - a neutral reference being as bad as a negative reference. All employer has to say to a prospective employer is former employee left without notice. It would be the truth. Prospective employer would draw its own conclusion.

So, legally, one can certainly resign and leave without notice. As a practical matter, most of the time, it is still better to resign and give notice as a professional would, work out the notice period and, on the last day, leave on good terms.

https://www.quora.com/What-could-happen ... ion-letter


The only thing I would add to this is; you might want to resign, or say that you are resigning and see what the reaction is. You can always walk out after you have served your notice without working the rest of it.

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